That Chick.
gatitaborrachita:

pardon-my-dust:

sagethenate:

katniss-everbeans:

gatitaborrachita:

pepperjdarcy:

gatitaborrachita:

meltingmarshmallow:

gatitaborrachita:

So I’m going to rant here a bit. The time of year has arrived where empathy and consideration go out the window. The image on the left is an ignorant portrayal of what is supposed to be a native woman. The image on the right is in fact, a native woman.There is no excuse for any race or culture to be compacted into a costume for one night of “fun”. Portrayals like these strip us of our humanity. I do not support any person who decides to make the conscious effort to perpetuate a vile act such as dressing up as something you’re not. You are not honoring me. You do not care about me. You are not going to use my culture to spice up your dull life for a night. I’m human. I’m native. I’m sick and tired.

Okay, but do keep in mind that “dressing up as something you’re not” is literally the point of Halloween. (Straying from what it originally was meant to be perhaps, but nonetheless, what it is today.) 
I am not trying to un-justify your offense to this particular costume (it isn’t something I would ever wear) but perhaps think of it this way:
Let’s say someone, a non-native american, really likes the Disney movie ‘Pocahontas’ and wants to dress up as the titular character for Halloween. (We all know that Pocahontas isn’t exactly an accurate portrayal of the real story but let’s set that aside for now.) Or maybe even dressing up as Tiger Lily to accompany a friend’s Peter Pan costume.
Would you consider this to be racist or offensive?
You say there is no excuse for anyone to dress up in the aesthetic of any race or culture but the fact of the matter is, it happens all the time, with every kind of culture + race, and I don’t think it is ever really meant to be harmful in the way you are perceiving it. Spirit halloween is shitty for plenty of reasons though, and it shows in a lot of their costumes as well. Especially anything accompanied with the word “sexy”… and everyone knows nothing is accurately designed or portrayed. All I am trying to say is that I personally believe there are a few exceptions to your claim.

Actually, let’s talk about Pocahontas and Tiger Lily for a secondThey’re both problematic characters for many reasonsI have a problem with Matoaka’s (Pocahontas’ real name) portrayal mainly because of the inaccuracy. She was a child when she met John Smith. She’s hypersexualized in her short buckskin dress and made to look like an older woman. Indeed it is not necessarily problematic to wear a costume that is 100 percent identical to the movie, but it does not sit right with me.
Tiger Lily on the otherhand, doesn’t speak throughout the entirety of her scenes. The “Why is the Red Man Red?” segment had me squirming awkwardly everytime I would see it. It’s not fun watching blatant racism being thrown in your face at such a young age. (If you don’t think that was one of the most offensive scenes you can fuck right off)
Costumes and representations that hypersexualize and demean native women perpetuate violence. Violence among indigenous women is an epidemic that has been overlooked throughout time. Harmful stereotypes in the media play a significant part in violence amongst indigenous women.
1 in 3 native women will be raped in her lifetime. 70 percent of abusers are non-native people.1,186 reported cases of missing indigenous women in Canada has called for a national inquiry that is STILL overlooked
Overall, this is extremely toxic. Cultural appropriation should not occur as a basis for costumes. There are so many other creative and original ideas one can muster up, but using race and culture stings like no other.

Hypersexualised? Yes. That costume above does that, and it’s wrong. But, as an official Member of the Cherokee Nation, there is nothing offensive about someone dressing up as a Native American. In fact, if done tastefully and in the right spirit, it’s an imitation, and imitation is the SINCEREST form of flattery. Think about it, someone finds inspiration from that way of life. It’s flattery! It wouldn’t be offensive if a member of another ethnic group dressed up as a white character, would it? No. Dressing up is an expression of awe and admiration.Disney’s Pocahontas was inaccurate, but the real story/history is probably more offensive to people on Tumblr considering she chose of her own free will to marry a white man, take on a white woman’s name, converted to Christianity (which is not a white man’s religion since Christ would not have been white, but very, very dark haired and exceedingly dark skinned and Christianity accepts any and all ethnic diversity), and then decided to move to a white man’s country. She did that without being forced… choosing to become a part of another culture. It was her choice. It made her happy. So, you can’t complain Disney was racist in making Pocahontas inaccurate, SINCE the character didn’t change her ways or her culture or religion in the movie. It made many anti-racist statements by Pocahontas telling John Smith she wasn’t going to change her ways but remain true to her people, and by calling him out for calling her a savage just because she wasn’t a part of his culture. So, logically, that’s not racism. That’s the antithesis. Was she sexualised? Yes. But all women of every race are sexualised by Hollywood and the media. It’s a problem that affects us all.  BUT, I do see how the ‘What Makes the Red Man Red’ song can be seen offensively. I’m Native American, my ancestors walked the Trail of Tears, and I don’t find the song offensive… to myself PERSONALLY. And I have family who suffered in the Trail of Tears. But I don’t blame people who find that particular song offensive.If we really want racism to end, and AGAIN… THIS is being said by a member of the Cherokee Nation (I have an Indian card, and I got my wisdom teeth cut out for FREE because of my heritage. It’s LEGIT. I get exemptions for my taxes and exempt from ObamaCare because I’m Native American) there needs to be an element of forgiveness. Bitterness and anger is not going to solve anything. It creates a bigger problem. Let’s face it, it’s possible for Native Americans to be prejudice towards others too. It’s a two way street. Hitler (a white man) committed grossly racist acts of murder against… who? Oh yeah, a white culture: German Jews.So, the step towards healing and real equality begins with forgiveness and letting go of bitterness. I’m a freaking Native American myself. I can say this legitimately. White people who aren’t Native Americans have the right to not being treated with discrimination either. They are human themselves. They suffer all sorts of bad, horrible things too. In some sense we segregate ourselves… and make a situation worse than it is.But hypersexualised is something that happens to ALL woman. We have it in the superhero world (*cough, cough*… Black Widow), the video game world… and every time a woman strips down for a movie (*cough, cough* Game of Thrones). It’s WHY I protest pole dancing, stripping, and pornography. It dehumanises women and makes them an object just for a man’s pleasure. Sure, women have the right to that vocation… it is their choice; but they’re objectifying themselves and catering to men’s lusts. It hypersexualises a woman just as much as this costume does.

What the fuck did I just read??😂😂😂

1. Everybody and their grandma’s cat claims to be Cherokee
2. Matoaka didn’t choose to marry John Rolfe in real life. She was kidnapped.
3. Healing and equality begin with the people that fucked up (read: oppressors) admitting what they did and learning WHY what they did was fucked up.


What the fuck is with idiots claiming we should feel flattered? How about you stop pandering to white people and stop telling us how we should feel?If some white twit wants to pay me a compliment, they better work to sincerely find out what makes me actually feel honoured. If they really cared, they wouldn’t be stepping all over my people and our culture. Stop being selfish and racist about this Halloween fake-ass bull.

I just want to state that, I am Native American and Japanese you don’t see me getting all fucking ass hurt for white people or any other colors wanting to go to Japan or liking my culture. It kinda makes me mad but at the same time it’s whatever. Also I see nothing wrong with someone dressing up as anything. The women on the left is dressing like a fucking white person but you don’t see white people getting all pissed. So yeah stfu stop giving our people bad names when it’s our job to be the caring one.

P.s I love white women.

You pretendians need to stay the fuck away from my postThere is absolutely no excuse or debating about the harmful affects of cultural appropriationWhen an oppressed group tells you that what you’re doing is oppressive and overall UNACCEPTABLE you DO NOT argue over themSeriously, I don’t give a flying fuck what your BQ is or the fact that your teeth were yanked out for freeGood for you! 👏THAT DOESN’T MEAN SHITSincerely,A pissed off indigenous woman

-If you have not set foot on a reservation-If your family can’t tell you about your tribe-If you don’t know what a pow wow is-if you’ve never eaten fry bread-if you don’t recognize indigenous pain and suffering DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT CLAIM TO BE NATIVE AMERICAN!Every white person who’s told me they’re native has said Cherokee, it was so often that I just wrote of any white person who told me they were native.

gatitaborrachita:

pardon-my-dust:

sagethenate:

katniss-everbeans:

gatitaborrachita:

pepperjdarcy:

gatitaborrachita:

meltingmarshmallow:

gatitaborrachita:

So I’m going to rant here a bit. The time of year has arrived where empathy and consideration go out the window. The image on the left is an ignorant portrayal of what is supposed to be a native woman. The image on the right is in fact, a native woman.
There is no excuse for any race or culture to be compacted into a costume for one night of “fun”.
Portrayals like these strip us of our humanity.
I do not support any person who decides to make the conscious effort to perpetuate a vile act such as dressing up as something you’re not.
You are not honoring me. You do not care about me. You are not going to use my culture to spice up your dull life for a night.
I’m human. I’m native. I’m sick and tired.

Okay, but do keep in mind that “dressing up as something you’re not” is literally the point of Halloween. (Straying from what it originally was meant to be perhaps, but nonetheless, what it is today.) 

I am not trying to un-justify your offense to this particular costume (it isn’t something I would ever wear) but perhaps think of it this way:

Let’s say someone, a non-native american, really likes the Disney movie ‘Pocahontas’ and wants to dress up as the titular character for Halloween. (We all know that Pocahontas isn’t exactly an accurate portrayal of the real story but let’s set that aside for now.) Or maybe even dressing up as Tiger Lily to accompany a friend’s Peter Pan costume.

Would you consider this to be racist or offensive?

You say there is no excuse for anyone to dress up in the aesthetic of any race or culture but the fact of the matter is, it happens all the time, with every kind of culture + race, and I don’t think it is ever really meant to be harmful in the way you are perceiving it. Spirit halloween is shitty for plenty of reasons though, and it shows in a lot of their costumes as well. Especially anything accompanied with the word “sexy”… and everyone knows nothing is accurately designed or portrayed. All I am trying to say is that I personally believe there are a few exceptions to your claim.

Actually, let’s talk about Pocahontas and Tiger Lily for a second
They’re both problematic characters for many reasons
I have a problem with Matoaka’s (Pocahontas’ real name) portrayal mainly because of the inaccuracy. She was a child when she met John Smith. She’s hypersexualized in her short buckskin dress and made to look like an older woman. Indeed it is not necessarily problematic to wear a costume that is 100 percent identical to the movie, but it does not sit right with me.

Tiger Lily on the otherhand, doesn’t speak throughout the entirety of her scenes.
The “Why is the Red Man Red?” segment had me squirming awkwardly everytime I would see it. It’s not fun watching blatant racism being thrown in your face at such a young age. (If you don’t think that was one of the most offensive scenes you can fuck right off)

Costumes and representations that hypersexualize and demean native women perpetuate violence. Violence among indigenous women is an epidemic that has been overlooked throughout time. Harmful stereotypes in the media play a significant part in violence amongst indigenous women.

1 in 3 native women will be raped in her lifetime. 70 percent of abusers are non-native people.
1,186 reported cases of missing indigenous women in Canada has called for a national inquiry that is STILL overlooked

Overall, this is extremely toxic. Cultural appropriation should not occur as a basis for costumes. There are so many other creative and original ideas one can muster up, but using race and culture stings like no other.

Hypersexualised? Yes. That costume above does that, and it’s wrong. But, as an official Member of the Cherokee Nation, there is nothing offensive about someone dressing up as a Native American. In fact, if done tastefully and in the right spirit, it’s an imitation, and imitation is the SINCEREST form of flattery. Think about it, someone finds inspiration from that way of life. It’s flattery!

It wouldn’t be offensive if a member of another ethnic group dressed up as a white character, would it? No. Dressing up is an expression of awe and admiration.

Disney’s Pocahontas was inaccurate, but the real story/history is probably more offensive to people on Tumblr considering she chose of her own free will to marry a white man, take on a white woman’s name, converted to Christianity (which is not a white man’s religion since Christ would not have been white, but very, very dark haired and exceedingly dark skinned and Christianity accepts any and all ethnic diversity), and then decided to move to a white man’s country. She did that without being forced… choosing to become a part of another culture. It was her choice. It made her happy. 

So, you can’t complain Disney was racist in making Pocahontas inaccurate, SINCE the character didn’t change her ways or her culture or religion in the movie. It made many anti-racist statements by Pocahontas telling John Smith she wasn’t going to change her ways but remain true to her people, and by calling him out for calling her a savage just because she wasn’t a part of his culture. So, logically, that’s not racism. That’s the antithesis. Was she sexualised? Yes. But all women of every race are sexualised by Hollywood and the media. It’s a problem that affects us all.  

BUT, I do see how the ‘What Makes the Red Man Red’ song can be seen offensively. I’m Native American, my ancestors walked the Trail of Tears, and I don’t find the song offensive… to myself PERSONALLY. And I have family who suffered in the Trail of Tears. But I don’t blame people who find that particular song offensive.

If we really want racism to end, and AGAIN… THIS is being said by a member of the Cherokee Nation (I have an Indian card, and I got my wisdom teeth cut out for FREE because of my heritage. It’s LEGIT. I get exemptions for my taxes and exempt from ObamaCare because I’m Native American) there needs to be an element of forgiveness. Bitterness and anger is not going to solve anything. It creates a bigger problem. Let’s face it, it’s possible for Native Americans to be prejudice towards others too. It’s a two way street. Hitler (a white man) committed grossly racist acts of murder against… who? Oh yeah, a white culture: German Jews.

So, the step towards healing and real equality begins with forgiveness and letting go of bitterness. I’m a freaking Native American myself. I can say this legitimately. White people who aren’t Native Americans have the right to not being treated with discrimination either. They are human themselves. They suffer all sorts of bad, horrible things too. In some sense we segregate ourselves… and make a situation worse than it is.

But hypersexualised is something that happens to ALL woman. We have it in the superhero world (*cough, cough*… Black Widow), the video game world… and every time a woman strips down for a movie (*cough, cough* Game of Thrones). It’s WHY I protest pole dancing, stripping, and pornography. It dehumanises women and makes them an object just for a man’s pleasure. Sure, women have the right to that vocation… it is their choice; but they’re objectifying themselves and catering to men’s lusts. It hypersexualises a woman just as much as this costume does.

What the fuck did I just read??
😂😂😂

1. Everybody and their grandma’s cat claims to be Cherokee

2. Matoaka didn’t choose to marry John Rolfe in real life. She was kidnapped.

3. Healing and equality begin with the people that fucked up (read: oppressors) admitting what they did and learning WHY what they did was fucked up.

What the fuck is with idiots claiming we should feel flattered? How about you stop pandering to white people and stop telling us how we should feel?

If some white twit wants to pay me a compliment, they better work to sincerely find out what makes me actually feel honoured. If they really cared, they wouldn’t be stepping all over my people and our culture.

Stop being selfish and racist about this Halloween fake-ass bull.

I just want to state that, I am Native American and Japanese you don’t see me getting all fucking ass hurt for white people or any other colors wanting to go to Japan or liking my culture. It kinda makes me mad but at the same time it’s whatever. Also I see nothing wrong with someone dressing up as anything. The women on the left is dressing like a fucking white person but you don’t see white people getting all pissed. So yeah stfu stop giving our people bad names when it’s our job to be the caring one.

P.s I love white women.

You pretendians need to stay the fuck away from my post
There is absolutely no excuse or debating about the harmful affects of cultural appropriation
When an oppressed group tells you that what you’re doing is oppressive and overall UNACCEPTABLE you DO NOT argue over them
Seriously, I don’t give a flying fuck what your BQ is or the fact that your teeth were yanked out for free
Good for you! 👏
THAT DOESN’T MEAN SHIT

Sincerely,
A pissed off indigenous woman

-If you have not set foot on a reservation
-If your family can’t tell you about your tribe
-If you don’t know what a pow wow is
-if you’ve never eaten fry bread
-if you don’t recognize indigenous pain and suffering

DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT CLAIM TO BE NATIVE AMERICAN!

Every white person who’s told me they’re native has said Cherokee, it was so often that I just wrote of any white person who told me they were native.

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape, transmisogyny - A transgender woman says she was locked in a cell with her rapistSeptember 29, 2014
The odds were already against Zahara Green when she entered prison on May 10, 2012. Prisons have long been plagued by a culture of sexual harassment and assault, but Green was a transgender woman in an all-male facility — making her about 13 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a non-transgender inmate,according to a 2009 study.
Green told BuzzFeed News she distinctly remembers her first day in general population at Rogers State Prison, a facility about an hour and a half outside of Savannah, Georgia. It was two months into her sentence, and she said she can still envision the officer dropping her off at her dorm and walking away.
“I kind of just felt that he was letting me out with the wolves. You’re on your own. It clicked in my mind,” she said. “I found my bed, I placed my stuff on my bed, and then I sat there for about an hour and people were just coming in and out as if this was some kind of showcase.”
Under federal law, states must seriously consider transgender inmates’ safety concerns — and the Georgia Department of Corrections has said it has zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Yet the state of Georgia placed Green in a men’s prison, where she faced a greater risk of being assaulted. Around the country, decisions on transgender inmates’ placement and their level of protection are ultimately made on a case-by-case basis. But according to her lawsuit, these often ambiguous decisions and lack of safety oversight may have played a role in Zahara Green’s alleged rape by another inmate — not while they mingled in general population, but while she was being secured in “protective custody.”
Green was approached by Darryl Ricard — a high-ranking gang member within the prison, she said — right after moving to the dorm at Rogers. He was in his seventh year of a life sentence for aggravated child molestation, rape, and kidnapping.
“He basically made me his property,” she said.
Over the next few weeks, as Ricard repeatedly coerced her to perform oral sex on him, Green would write to prison administrative staff about the unsafe environment for transgender and homosexual inmates, Green said. Rogers State Prison housed one other transgender woman at the time, to Green’s knowledge, although Green was the only one receiving hormone treatment. In one letter, she says she mentioned being sexually targeted by Ricard.
Shortly afterward, she requested to be put into protective custody, which is typically a solitary cell for prisoners who believe their safety is at risk, carefully monitored by prison officials. What allegedly happened next makes up the bulk of a lawsuit Green and her Atlanta-based lawyer Mario Williams filed in May against the prison’s warden, deputy warden, and two correctional officers. Last week, they filed another complaint against an additional 13 additional correctional officers.
On Sept. 21, 2012, Green and Ricard were separately admitted into protective custody. According to Green, Ricard was the chief reason she had requested the special security measures. But for still unclear reasons, when Green entered her protective custody cell around 4:30 a.m., “Ricard was waiting” there, the complaint says. “Ricard raped Green, and the Defendants to this action all knew Ricard was going to rape (or at the very least, sexually assault) Green yet permitted Ricard to sexually assault Green.” The correction officers allegedly “condoned” the rape.
According to Williams, Green’s attorney, Green and Ricard had been assigned to different protective custody cells, and Ricard should have never been allowed in Green’s cell. Nearly 24 hours passed, though security checks were supposed to be made at least every 30 minutes. Williams said he believes the Georgia Department of Corrections knew about the situation and did nothing to prevent Green’s assault. The department declined to comment on the case to BuzzFeed News, citing pending litigation.
“Everyone has to wonder how Green’s assailant got put in protective custody on the same day and same time as Green. Then permitted to be in Green’s cell for nearly 24 hours,” Williams said. “This case is about more than Ricard. There has been official misconduct.”In a court document responding to Green’s complaint, a lawyer for the defendants — repeatedly referring to Green as “he” — denied that the deputy warden had read any letter about Ricard’s “oral sodomy” of Green. The response noted that Green’s mother had contacted the prison about her daughter’s safety concerns, but alleged that when asked directly, Green said she “was not afraid.” The response also said that Green was “at some point … placed in the same cell as inmate Darryl Ricard.”
While the case moves forward, some local and national groups have begun rallying around Green. One of the first people to reach out to her was Kenneth Glasgow of the Ordinary People Society. He describes Green as “humble and quiet,” but also “tormented and traumatized,” unable to talk at length about the incident; while Green spoke to BuzzFeed News on Wednesday, she once paused to keep from crying.
After the alleged assault — when Green eventually got a guard’s attention — a sergeant came to the cell, she said. He apparently saw Ricard with a razor blade in his hand and stuck pepper spray through an opening in the cell door. Ricard quickly surrendered, Green said, and they were both separately removed from the cell. Later, Green was taken to a sexual assault examination nurse, who performed a rape kit.
Green was kept in protective custody for the next week and a half. Then she was transferred to Georgia State Prison, a facility down the street, where she immediately requested protective custody. Eventually she was placed in a unit made up a several single cells housing all transgender inmates. “I was the sixth or seventh on transgender hormone therapy,” Green said. She felt safe there.
But it wasn’t until her final transfer — to Atlanta Transitional Facility — that Green said she felt her life begin to change for the better.
Green was 17 when she began transitioning. It wasn’t long after that she began shoplifting from various Walmarts — landing her with a prison sentence and a life ban from the retailer. She says she doesn’t think this anymore, but at the time, theft felt like her only option.
“I did not think it was possible to find a job as a transgender person in Georgia. All the trans people I knew were either shoplifting, forging checks, or prostituting,” she said. “I didn’t know a single transgender person who had a job.”
At the transitional center, “they opened my eyes to another way,” she said. She’s been on parole since her release in March. In August, she began school, working to become a paralegal. She has a job at Walgreens. She’s helped her other transgender friends find jobs. She’s 25 now and said, “There’s a better life for me.”
She hopes one outcome of the lawsuit is that transgender people are not tested out in general population before officials decide it’s not a safe fit. While the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act forces states to take transgender inmates’ safety concerns into consideration, Harper Jean Tobin of the National Center for Transgender Equality said it’s not clear that they always do. (In Georgia, another transgender inmate is currently fighting for her access to hormone therapy in a high-profile case.)
“If institutions are able to make the culture shift … toward not making those auto assumptions but really focusing on what is keeping each person safe,” Tobin said, “they will start making those placements in women’s facilities more often.”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape, transmisogyny - A transgender woman says she was locked in a cell with her rapist
September 29, 2014

The odds were already against Zahara Green when she entered prison on May 10, 2012. Prisons have long been plagued by a culture of sexual harassment and assault, but Green was a transgender woman in an all-male facility — making her about 13 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a non-transgender inmate,according to a 2009 study.

Green told BuzzFeed News she distinctly remembers her first day in general population at Rogers State Prison, a facility about an hour and a half outside of Savannah, Georgia. It was two months into her sentence, and she said she can still envision the officer dropping her off at her dorm and walking away.

“I kind of just felt that he was letting me out with the wolves. You’re on your own. It clicked in my mind,” she said. “I found my bed, I placed my stuff on my bed, and then I sat there for about an hour and people were just coming in and out as if this was some kind of showcase.”

Under federal law, states must seriously consider transgender inmates’ safety concerns — and the Georgia Department of Corrections has said it has zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Yet the state of Georgia placed Green in a men’s prison, where she faced a greater risk of being assaulted. Around the country, decisions on transgender inmates’ placement and their level of protection are ultimately made on a case-by-case basis. But according to her lawsuit, these often ambiguous decisions and lack of safety oversight may have played a role in Zahara Green’s alleged rape by another inmate — not while they mingled in general population, but while she was being secured in “protective custody.”

Green was approached by Darryl Ricard — a high-ranking gang member within the prison, she said — right after moving to the dorm at Rogers. He was in his seventh year of a life sentence for aggravated child molestation, rape, and kidnapping.

“He basically made me his property,” she said.

Over the next few weeks, as Ricard repeatedly coerced her to perform oral sex on him, Green would write to prison administrative staff about the unsafe environment for transgender and homosexual inmates, Green said. Rogers State Prison housed one other transgender woman at the time, to Green’s knowledge, although Green was the only one receiving hormone treatment. In one letter, she says she mentioned being sexually targeted by Ricard.

Shortly afterward, she requested to be put into protective custody, which is typically a solitary cell for prisoners who believe their safety is at risk, carefully monitored by prison officials. What allegedly happened next makes up the bulk of a lawsuit Green and her Atlanta-based lawyer Mario Williams filed in May against the prison’s warden, deputy warden, and two correctional officers. Last week, they filed another complaint against an additional 13 additional correctional officers.

On Sept. 21, 2012, Green and Ricard were separately admitted into protective custody. According to Green, Ricard was the chief reason she had requested the special security measures. But for still unclear reasons, when Green entered her protective custody cell around 4:30 a.m., “Ricard was waiting” there, the complaint says. “Ricard raped Green, and the Defendants to this action all knew Ricard was going to rape (or at the very least, sexually assault) Green yet permitted Ricard to sexually assault Green.” The correction officers allegedly “condoned” the rape.

According to Williams, Green’s attorney, Green and Ricard had been assigned to different protective custody cells, and Ricard should have never been allowed in Green’s cell. Nearly 24 hours passed, though security checks were supposed to be made at least every 30 minutes. Williams said he believes the Georgia Department of Corrections knew about the situation and did nothing to prevent Green’s assault. The department declined to comment on the case to BuzzFeed News, citing pending litigation.

“Everyone has to wonder how Green’s assailant got put in protective custody on the same day and same time as Green. Then permitted to be in Green’s cell for nearly 24 hours,” Williams said. “This case is about more than Ricard. There has been official misconduct.”

In a court document responding to Green’s complaint, a lawyer for the defendants — repeatedly referring to Green as “he” — denied that the deputy warden had read any letter about Ricard’s “oral sodomy” of Green. The response noted that Green’s mother had contacted the prison about her daughter’s safety concerns, but alleged that when asked directly, Green said she “was not afraid.” The response also said that Green was “at some point … placed in the same cell as inmate Darryl Ricard.”

While the case moves forward, some local and national groups have begun rallying around Green. One of the first people to reach out to her was Kenneth Glasgow of the Ordinary People Society. He describes Green as “humble and quiet,” but also “tormented and traumatized,” unable to talk at length about the incident; while Green spoke to BuzzFeed News on Wednesday, she once paused to keep from crying.

After the alleged assault — when Green eventually got a guard’s attention — a sergeant came to the cell, she said. He apparently saw Ricard with a razor blade in his hand and stuck pepper spray through an opening in the cell door. Ricard quickly surrendered, Green said, and they were both separately removed from the cell. Later, Green was taken to a sexual assault examination nurse, who performed a rape kit.

Green was kept in protective custody for the next week and a half. Then she was transferred to Georgia State Prison, a facility down the street, where she immediately requested protective custody. Eventually she was placed in a unit made up a several single cells housing all transgender inmates. “I was the sixth or seventh on transgender hormone therapy,” Green said. She felt safe there.

But it wasn’t until her final transfer — to Atlanta Transitional Facility — that Green said she felt her life begin to change for the better.

Green was 17 when she began transitioning. It wasn’t long after that she began shoplifting from various Walmarts — landing her with a prison sentence and a life ban from the retailer. She says she doesn’t think this anymore, but at the time, theft felt like her only option.

“I did not think it was possible to find a job as a transgender person in Georgia. All the trans people I knew were either shoplifting, forging checks, or prostituting,” she said. “I didn’t know a single transgender person who had a job.”

At the transitional center, “they opened my eyes to another way,” she said. She’s been on parole since her release in March. In August, she began school, working to become a paralegal. She has a job at Walgreens. She’s helped her other transgender friends find jobs. She’s 25 now and said, “There’s a better life for me.”

She hopes one outcome of the lawsuit is that transgender people are not tested out in general population before officials decide it’s not a safe fit. While the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act forces states to take transgender inmates’ safety concerns into consideration, Harper Jean Tobin of the National Center for Transgender Equality said it’s not clear that they always do. (In Georgia, another transgender inmate is currently fighting for her access to hormone therapy in a high-profile case.)

“If institutions are able to make the culture shift … toward not making those auto assumptions but really focusing on what is keeping each person safe,” Tobin said, “they will start making those placements in women’s facilities more often.”

Source

(via howtobeafuckinglady)

daniiphae:

This is very hard for me at this moment in my life to express my heart/mind to the world, but I will say these last few months have been the worst months of my life. I was dating someone (J$tash) that abused me verbally ,emotionally and physically throughout the end duration of our relationship. Monday morning on September 15th 2014 my life was forever, changed. A person I thought and believed I could trust, whom I gave my love/time/energy to brutally punched me in my face repeatedly with his fists while I became slowly unconscious covered in blood in his brooklyn apartment bed. After he was done he told me to not tell anyone to not tell my friends, He also started to prepare legal action to protect himself in case I pressed charges against him. He cried and became unstable within his emotions and was apologetic towards his actions, but would continue to say i did this to myself.

He then boarded a flight to Japan a few hours after and has been sending me text messages claiming he will destroy me even more than he already did. He said he will ruin my life! I got brutally beaten for confronting him on infidelity which caused him to become violent in an instant.

Do not interpret this as a cry for help this is honestly a decision to speak up against domestic violence for those who cant due to the manipulative acts our abusers inflict on us to never speak up and for those who didn’t survive because of brutal domestic violence.

I will not allow myself to sit in the shadows of darkness and disrespect myself for not taking a stand.

I am speaking out for all my women!

Be brave this is what bravery looks like.


Abuser: Justin Joseph / J$tash

alte-hase:

— Andrei Tarkovsky

(via post--aspirational)

ashoutintothevoid:

Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

ashoutintothevoid:

Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

(via sluttyloser)

the-goddamazon:

soulrevision:

ill-ary:

'Meet the Generation of Incredible Native American Women Fighting to Preserve Their Culture' via Marie Claire

Yes!!!

Native women serving you that superb beadwork.

(via gatitaborrachita)

Racist Trolls Stalk FKA Twigs Because She's Dating Robert Pattinson

dynastylnoire:

angrywocunited:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

White girls are absolutely vile. These jealous white girls are mad because FKA Twigs is a goddess, and they’ll always be expired jars of mayonnaise. Stay mad. 

this is why we don’t bang with y’all man.

"I may be white, but I don’t like my people much" half white, but damn that side makes me so ashamed…

(via gatitaborrachita)

(Source: azene, via post--aspirational)

jinxyourself:

this is fucking beautiful!!!! forever reblog.

jinxyourself:

this is fucking beautiful!!!! forever reblog.

(Source: masmucho, via vodkaslumber)

facedownunderthemoss:

haiweewicci:

lastrealindians:

86 years ago today (1927) Gutzon Borglum began defacing the sacred BlackHills with Mt. Rushmore.

Everyone must remember that “Mt. Rushmore” (the Black Hills) does not legally belong to the federal government, and especially not to South Dakota.  It was acknowledged as belonging to the sovereign Lakota Nation in the Sioux Treaty of 1868.  The federal government STOLE the Hills from the Lakota, breaking the law they wrote with their own hands!  The US is a repeat criminal but no one holds them accountable!

never fucking forget.

facedownunderthemoss:

haiweewicci:

lastrealindians:

86 years ago today (1927) Gutzon Borglum began defacing the sacred BlackHills with Mt. Rushmore.

Everyone must remember that “Mt. Rushmore” (the Black Hills) does not legally belong to the federal government, and especially not to South Dakota.  It was acknowledged as belonging to the sovereign Lakota Nation in the Sioux Treaty of 1868.  The federal government STOLE the Hills from the Lakota, breaking the law they wrote with their own hands!  The US is a repeat criminal but no one holds them accountable!

never fucking forget.

(via gatitaborrachita)

vintagegal:

Beetlejuice (1988)

(via missavagardner)

luvallstuff:

The thing that’s so disgusting about the murders of Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown, Sean Bell etc (a very long list) is that it’s not like we’re trying to figure out who killed them. We know perfectly well. We’re just trying to figure out if that black kid deserved to die. They’re humanity is put on trial, like being a person wasn’t enough. Black people literally have to prove that we’re worthy of living.

(via sluttyloser)

tokyoghettopussy:

raresighting:

YASS BITCH YASSS

omg yes

(Source: huffpostlive, via gatitaborrachita)

zimbabwe2003:

You were brainwashed into thinking European features are the epitome of beauty

(Source: zimbabwe666, via gatitaborrachita)

spikespiegell:

do ya ever bring your pet up to a mirror and ur like “that you”

(via moiralina)

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